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    Green Chemistry
    Initiative

    The Green Chemistry Initiative at the University of Toronto

    2019 Symposium schedule now online!

    Keep up to date with our 2019 GCI symposium titled ˇ°Frontiers in Green Chemistry: Challenges in the Anthropoceneˇ±. The symposium schedule is now online! Check it out here.


    Announcing the 2019 Symposium!



    The GCI is proud to announce our 2019 symposium titled "Frontiers in Green Chemistry" Challenges in the Anthropocene" will be held at the University of Toronto on May 16th and 17th. Also included is a crash source on the fundamentals of Green Chemistry. More information n be found here.


    Inherently Safer Chemistry for Accident Prevention - Green Chemistry Principle # 11

    The Green Chemistry Initiative explains how the choice of inherently safer chemistry n minimize the potential for chemil accidents.



    Read the corresponding blog post and check out our other videos on the principles of green chemistry at our YouTube channel.


    Real-Time Analysis for Pollution Prevention - Green Chemistry Principle # 11

    The Green Chemistry Initiative explains some real-time analytil techniques which n help reduce hazards in chemil reactions.



    Read the corresponding blog post and check out our other videos on the principles of green chemistry at our YouTube channel.


    Highlights of the 2018 GCI Symposium

    Want to tch up on the 2018 GCI Symposium? One of our members, Rachel Hems, wrote a newsletter article for the Chemil Institute of nada highlighting talks from invited speakers and interactive se studies. Click here to find out more.



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    Upcoming Seminar: Quantifying Environmental Contaminants at Environment and Climate Change nada

    On May 8th, 2018 Magali Houde from Environment and Climate Change nada will be coming to the University of Toronto to discuss the development of analytic techniques to quantify environmental contaminants in aquatic systems. se studies include threatened populations in the St. Lawrence River ecosystem as well as trends in chemil contamination in the nadian Arctic. To learn more about the seminar please visit our seminar series page.


    Early Bird Registration for the GCI Symposium is Extended!

    Are you planning on attending the GCI Symposium but haven't finalized your plans? You are in luck, the Early Bird Registration has been extended to Sunday April 22nd, 2018! Register now here!

    For full details, please visit our Symposium page.


    Announcing the 2018 Symposium!



    The GCI is proud to announce our 2018 symposium will be held at the University of Toronto this year, and will also include a crash source on the fundamentals of Green Chemistry. More information n be found here.



    Green Chemistry 101

    One of our members, Rachel Hems, wrote an article for the Let's Talk Science online platform Curiocity lled Green Chemistry 101. It highlights the basics of green chemistry, sustainability, and how you n incorporate green chemistry in and out of the lab! More information n be found here.


    Design for Degradation - Green Chemistry Principle # 10

    The Green Chemistry Initiative explains Designing For Degradation: synthesizing molecules that degrade to harmless molecules once their desired function is complete.



    Read the corresponding blog post and check out our other videos on the principles of green chemistry at our YouTube channel.



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    Ecotalysis: Harnessing Phytoextraction for Chemil Transformations

    By Karlee Bamford, Treasurer for the GCI

    What is ecotalysis? I had never heard this term before until reading a recent publition from Grison and coworkers in the RSC journal Green Chemistry entitled ˇ°Ecotalyzed Suzuki cross coupling of heteroaryl compoundsˇ±.1 In this work, the authors perform the familiar Suzuki cross-coupling of arylboronic acids (Figure 1) with heteroaryl halides. However, they use a thoroughly unfamiliar palladium talyst: the common water hyacinth.


    Figure 1. The general reaction for Suzuki cross-coupling (Ar = substituted phenyl, thiophene, or indole groups).

    Continue reading at our blog.


    talysis - Green Chemistry Principle # 9

    The Green Chemistry Initiative explains how talysts work, and why they are so useful in making chemil reactions more efficient.




    Check out our other videos on the principles of green chemistry at our Youtube Channel


    Upcoming Seminar: Sustainability at Sanofi Pasteur

    On July 11th 2017 Mr. Douglas Kube of Sanofi Pasteur will be coming to the University of Toronto to discuss sustainability at Sanofi Pasteur. To learn more about the seminar please visit our seminar series page.


    Issues of Sustainability in Laboratories Outside the Field of Chemistry: Pipette Tips

    By David Djenic, Member-at-Large for the GCI

    As a biochemistry student in the Green Chemistry Initiative, I'm interested in looking at how to implement the principles of green chemistry in molecular biology and biochemistry labs. While molecular biology labs focus more on studying biologil systems and molecules rather than synthesizing new molecules, like in synthetic chemistry, there are still problems when it comes to performing environmentally sustainable research.

    Read more at our blog.


    Going to CSC 2017? We have a Green Chemistry and Sustainability Travel Scholarship!

    Green Chemistry Initiative (GCI) and GreenCentre nada (GCC) are offering up to five (5) travel scholarships valued $300 each for 100th nadian Chemistry Conference and Exhibition attendees. These travel scholarships will be awarded to those who are in financial need, and those to whom share an interest sustainability.

    The due date of this applition is April 10th, 5:00 pm EDT

    For specific details on eligibility and how to apply please visit our Symposium Webpage here and look under "Green Chemistry and Sustainability Travel Scholarships".




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    GCI Video 8: Reduce Derivatives

    The Green Chemistry Initiative shows that, although chemilly useful, derivatives such as protecting groups are wasteful and should be avoided whenever possible.




    Check out our other videos on the principles of green chemistry at our Youtube Channel


    Taking Concrete Steps to CO2 Sequestration

    By Annabelle Wong, Member-at-Large for the GCI

    With heightened concerns on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in recent years, scientists and engineers have come up with some innovative solutions to mitigate rbon dioxide emissions. One solution is to utilize and covert CO2 to everyday products such as fuels and plastics. Recently I learned that CO2 is now being converted into cement on an industrial sle.

    Read more at our blog.


    Announcing the 2017 Symposium!

    The GCI is proud to announce our 2017 symposium will be part of CSC this year, and will also include a Green Chemistry crash course.

    More information n be found here.



    Recycling Perovskite Solar Cells

    By Judy Tsao, Member-at-Large for the GCI

    Solar energy is arguably the most abundant and environmentally friendly source of energy that we have access to. In fact, crystalline silicon solar cells have been employed in parts of the world at a comparable cost to the price of electricity derived from fossil fuels.1 The large-sle employment of solar cells, however, remains challenging as the efficiency of existing solar cells still needs to be improved signifintly.

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    GCI Video 7: Use of Renewable Feedstocks

    The Green Chemistry Initiative explains what renewable feedstocks are, and how we n use them in the lab.



    Check out our other videos on the principles of green chemistry at our Youtube Channel